The Stamp of Christianity

I recently read a review in Commonweal Magazine of Dominion: How the Christian Revolution Remade the World by Tom Holland, and I now have requested a hold on it through my public library. Here is another review of this book, and here is a link to the essay which was apparently the original inspiration: Tom Holland: Why I was wrong about Christianity. Tom Holland does not identify as Christian, at least not as a religious believer, but he recognizes that he (and everybody else in western culture, religious or otherwise), has a worldview that has been overwhelmingly shaped by Christianity.

Following are some excerpts from the essay. Regarding the ancient world:

The longer I spent immersed in the study of classical antiquity, the more alien and unsettling I came to find it. The values of Leonidas, whose people had practised a peculiarly murderous form of eugenics, and trained their young to kill uppity Untermenschen by night, were nothing that I recognised as my own; nor were those of Caesar, who was reported to have killed a million Gauls and enslaved a million more. It was not just the extremes of callousness that I came to find shocking, but the lack of a sense that the poor or the weak might have any intrinsic value.

On the Enlightenment rejection of religion:

“Every sensible man,” Voltaire wrote, “every honourable man, must hold the Christian sect in horror.” Rather than acknowledge that his ethical principles might owe anything to Christianity, he preferred to derive them from a range of other sources – not just classical literature, but Chinese philosophy and his own powers of reason. Yet Voltaire, in his concern for the weak and ­oppressed, was marked more enduringly by the stamp of biblical ethics than he cared to admit. His defiance of the Christian God, in a paradox that was certainly not unique to him, drew on motivations that were, in part at least, recognisably Christian.

About the current state of affairs:

Today, even as belief in God fades across the West, the countries that were once collectively known as Christendom continue to bear the stamp of the two-millennia-old revolution that Christianity represents. It is the principal reason why, by and large, most of us who live in post-Christian societies still take for granted that it is nobler to suffer than to inflict suffering. It is why we generally assume that every human life is of equal value. In my morals and ethics, I have learned to accept that I am not Greek or Roman at all, but thoroughly and proudly Christian.

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